lightjetlady:

safteyinnumbness:

this was on ‘BBC human planet’

chaoticclutteredmind:

Deep in the rainforests of the Indian state of Meghalaya, bridges are not built, they’re grown. For more than 500 years locals have guided roots and vines from the native Ficus Elastica (rubber tree) across rivers, using hollowed out trees to create root guidance systems. When the roots and vines reach the opposite bank they are allowed to take root. Some of the bridges are over 100 feet long and can support the weight of 50 people.

This looks so much like Return of the Jedi I can’t even…

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LET’S GATHER ONE MILLION PEOPLE TO STOP THE CORPORATE DEATH STAR

kawaiimon:

fadeddream-s:

Avaaz staff at the TPP talks projected the petition on the wall of the hotel where the conference is taking place, but security shut them down! Fortunately, we were able to deliver our call to US Trade Delegate Andrea Mead — pictures of our delivery are here. The pressure is working – the talks are now going to enter a 15th round of negotiations next year! Let’s reach one million to stop the Corporate Death Star — sign now and forward. 

Posted: 12 September 2012
Details are leaking of a top-secret, global corporate power grab of breathtaking scope — attacking everything from a free Internet to health and environmental regulations. It’s up to us to stop it.

Big business has a new plan to fatten their pockets: a giant global pact, with an international tribunal to enforce it, that is kept top secret for years (even from our lawmakers!) and then brought down like a Death Star on our democracies. Big Tobacco, Big Oil, Big Pharma, Walmart and almost 600 other corporate lobbyists are all in on the final draft — including limits on smoking laws, affordable medicines and free speech on the Net.

Information about the corporate Death Star has been leaking, and now outcries in each of our countries could shake the confidence of negotiators and scuttle the talks forever. Let’s get to a million against the global corporate takeover. Sign the petition on the right, then forward this campaign to help us reach one million!

*The deal, called the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), is a pact that the United States is negotiating with 8 other countries including Australia, Malaysia and Vietnam. Labelled as a “free trade” agreement, much of it is written to protect investors from government regulation, even if that regulation is passed in the public interest. You can read more about it here: https://en.avaaz.org/760/tpp-secret-talks-free-trade-agreement

SIGN THE PETITION HERE: http://www.avaaz.org/en/stop_the_corporate_death_star/?slideshow

More info: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/13/obama-trade-document-leak_n_1592593.html

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9.12.12. photography,world,
fadedandblurred:

How do you photograph one of the most secretive countries in the world? Simply photograph what they want you to see. Charlie Crane spent a year getting permission to go in and photograph North Korea. Carefully staged images look almost too eerily perfect.
[via Behance]

fadedandblurred:

How do you photograph one of the most secretive countries in the world? Simply photograph what they want you to see. Charlie Crane spent a year getting permission to go in and photograph North Korea. Carefully staged images look almost too eerily perfect.

[via Behance]

(via warmbug)

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9.11.12. 9/11,hope,world,

thegreekisland:

We Are All Americans: The World’s Response to 9/11

steeples:

In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, people all over the world stood shoulder-to-shoulder in mourning, solidarity, sympathy and friendship with the people of the United States. Here are a few of those international reactions, both organized and spontaneous, that occurred in the days following September 11, 2001.

In London, the Star Spangled Banner played during the Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace, while traffic came to a standstill in The Mall nearby.

In Beijing, tens of thousands of people visited the U.S. Embassy, leaving flowers, cards, funeral wreaths and hand-written notes of condolence on the sidewalk out front.

In Moscow, women who spoke no English and had never been to the U.S. were captured on film sobbing in front of a makeshift tribute on a sidewalk, and every single church and monastery in Romania held a memorial prayer.

In France, a well-known newspaper, Le Monde, ran a headline reading, “We Are All Americans.”

In the Middle East, both the Israeli president and the Palestinian leader condemned the attacks, and made a show of donating blood.

Kuwaitis lined up to donate blood as well. Jordanians signed letters of sympathy.

In Tehran, an entire stadium of people gathered for a soccer match observed a moment of silence, and in Turkey, flags flew at half-mast.

In Berlin, 200,000 people packed the streets leading to the Brandenburg Gate.

A thousand miles south, in Dubrovnik, Croatia, schoolchildren took a break from classes to bow their heads in silence.

In Dublin, shops and pubs were closed during a national day of mourning, and people waited in a three-hour line to sign a book of condolences.

In Sweden, Norway and Finland, trams and buses halted in tribute, and in Russia, television and radio stations went silent to commemorate the innocent dead.

In Azerbaijan, Japan, Greenland, Bulgaria and Tajiskitan, people gathered in squares to light candles, murmur good wishes and pray. And in Pretoria, South Africa, little kids perched on their parents’ shoulders holding mini American flags.

Firefighters in Hungary tied black ribbons to their trucks, firefighters in South Africa flew red, white and blue, and firefighters in Poland sounded their sirens, letting loose a collective wail one warm afternoon.

Cubans offered medical supplies. Ethiopians offered prayers. Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan offered their air space, and dozens of other world leaders called the White House to offer their support.

Hundreds of thousands of people in Canada, Albania and Sierra Leone marched in the streets in shows of solidarity, and mosques in Bangladesh, Yemen, Pakistan, Libya and Sudan trembled with clerics’ condemnation of those “cowardly” and “un-Islamic” attacks.

Lebanese generals convened to sign letters of sympathy, and in Italy, Pope John Paul II fell to his knees in prayer.

Albania, Ireland, Israel, Canada, Croatia, South Korea and the Czech Republic all declared national days of mourning, and the legendary bells of Notre Dame echoed throughout Paris.

In Italy, race car drivers preparing for the upcoming Italian Grand Prix silenced their engines, and in London, hundreds stood quietly during the noontime chimes of Big Ben.

In Belgium, people held hands, forming a human chain in front of the Brussels World Trade Center, and seventeen time zones away, strangers in Indonesia gathered on a beach to pray.

In India, children taped up signs that read, “This is an attack on all of us,” and in Austria, church bells tolled in unison.

(via heathyr)

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9.11.12. 9/11,hope,world,

The most forgotten fact about Sept. 11th’s aftermath

misesman:

wombatattack:

One week after the attack Iran held a candle-lit vigil in honor of the victims. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that if you peer at the upper left corner of this jpeg you’ll see that it is actually TIME Europe which documented this event.

Again, did not know this. Type of thing that needs to be known.

(via formerlyhyruling-deactivated201)

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plegarmour:

Yabusame, Japanese ritual mounted archery.

(via authenticfauxhemian)

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pictures taken by the Google Street View car cam (Utsira, Norway - Sao Joao Del Rei, Brazil - Inverallochy, Scotland - Prejmer, Romania - Saint Nicolas De La Grave, France - Capetown, South Africa)

(Source: stephwinchester, via beautiful-portals)

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sonneillonv:

fyeahafrica:

Portraits of people from Northern Kenya taken by John Kenny

Both the subjects and the composition are beautiful.  

(Source: , via lifelike81)

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5.11.12. photography,world,

ourafrica:

Bashar Shglila captures life in the Libyan deserts.

(via kawaiimon)

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iheartmyart:

Derweze, also known as the door to hell, is a 70 meter wide hole in the middle of the Karakum desert in Turkmenistan. The hole was formed in 1971 when a team of soviet geologists had their drilling rig collapse when they hit a cavern filled with natural gas. In an attempt to avoid poisonous discharge, they decided to burn it off, thinking that the gas would be depleted in only a few days. Derweze is still burning today 

(via goodnamesgone)

(via maliciousbee)

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